Dr. Nélido Gonzalez-Segredo

Dr. Nélido Gonzalez-Segredo

Dr. Nélido González-Segredo was a Senior Research Associate (Oberassistent) with the MOSAIC Group between September 2007 and September 2010. He is a Spanish citizen, born in 1971 in Caracas, Venezuela. After leaving the MOSAIC Group, he joined the Interdisciplinary Centre for Nonlinear Phenomena and Complex Systems at the Free University of Brussels, Belgium.


Nélido did his Masters in Physics at the University of La Laguna (Spain, 1989-1994), specialising in atomic, molecular and condensed matter physics. He then joined the Northumbria Photovoltaics Application Centre (UK, 1995) to do photovoltaics engineering research. After that he undertook an MPhil degree on transport kinetic theory at the Autonomous University of Barcelona (Spain, 1996-1997). He worked on cellular-automaton models for complex fluid flow during his stays at the Condensed Matter Theory group at the University of Cambridge (UK, 1997-1998) and the Soft and Biological Matter Theory group at the University of Oxford (UK, 1997-1998).


Nélido carried out his PhD thesis at the Centre for Computational Science, University of London (UK, 1999-2004), working on lattice-Boltzmann simulations of fluid segregation and liquid crystal self-assembly, supervised by Prof. Peter Coveney. Nélido then took up a 2-year postdoctoral position in the group of Prof. Daan Frenkel, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics (The Netherlands, 2004-2006), modeling poly-electrolyte and biocolloid transport, also in collaboration with Dr. Ignacio Pagonabarraga at the Department of Physics of the University of Barcelona. After that, he joined the lab of Prof. Francesco Mallamace at the University of Messina as an EU Marie Curie fellow (2006-2007), working on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled water and bilayer membranes in close collaboration with Prof. Gene Stanley (Boston University) and Dr. Fernando Bresme (Imperial College London).


Nélido's research in the MOSAIC Group was centered on modeling and simulating systems of interest in biophysics and biotechnology such as biomembranes, biopolymers, and biocolloids (e.g. viruses). He employed mesoscopic and atomistic methods to investigate structural and dynamical properties in phenomena such as hydration, fission and partitioning in membranes, colloid encapsulation, and electrophoresis. In addition, he also worked on stochastic chemical kinetics and the development of efficient computational algorithms for its simulation.